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Mathematics and Computer Science
Assistant Principal: Mr. Vikram Arora

Office: Room 107DPhone: (718) 817-7726

Email: arora@bxscience.edu


The Bronx High School of Science Mathematics, Computer Science and Technology Department offers advanced placement and honors courses as well as a wide variety of college level electives in mathematics and computer science. These electives include Multivariate Calculus & Partial Differential Equations, Linear Algebra & Differential Equations, Computer Game Programming and Android App Development. Students are encouraged to participate in challenging problem solving activities and pursue independent research in mathematics or computer science.


Congratulations! Mathematics Department faculty congratulates 2 senior Math and Computer Science Research students Vera Zarubin and Wataru Takada with mastery of advanced areas of Mathematics and Computer Science demonstrated by placing first, and fifth in the 2018 NYC metro Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (JSHS) finals round. They were among of only 5 NYC students selected for the National JSHS competition.

Faculty Adviser: Dr. Vladimir Shapovalov.

AP Mathematics: Mr. Vikram Arora.


· Zarubin, Vera, First Place in 2018 JSHS finals

 

A Novel Methodology to Build Organic Multifunctional Materials via Magnetic Alignment 

 

Vera is a Bronx Science senior from the Bronx in the Mathematics/Computer Science Research Program. Her project in materials science and engineering focuses on the application of magnetophoresis, or the motion induced by a magnetic field on a particle in a fluid, to control the assembly of polymers. Vera implemented thermodynamics equations to describe magnetophoresis and discovered through experimentation that the application of magnetic fields resulted in the alignment of robust nanostructures. Her approach significantly outperforms attempts of experts in the field. Her methodology is applicable to the assembly of polymers for energy harvesting applications and nanoscale biomedical devices. Outside of research, Vera is a member of the Bronx Science cross country and track teams and plays classical clarinet.

 

· Takada, Wataru, fifth place in 2018 JSHS finals

 

On the Growth of Exponential Progressions

 

Wataru is a Bronx Science senior from Manhattan. His project is focused on developing a growth model for a new object in additive combinatorics related to sumsets that used numerical optimization to obtain sharp bounds for the size of specific cases of base sets over Shimura varieties in Weisstraus restriction mappings. After he created his mathematical model, the numerical optimization algorithm was inputted into Mathematica as a non-linear programming process. There were no previous experts to explore sumsets with torsion free groups that allow well-defined exponential operators, which makes exponential progressions a completely unique object of study within this field. While studies in exponential representations of integers through minimal g-adic representations have been discussed in the works of Nathanson and Khovanskii in the context of metric geometries with bi-Lipschitz equivalence and group nets, this project aimed for a simpler and more effective approach with base-n integer representations. With this successful approach, he would be able to predict the growth rate of exponential progressions over a much more general class of base structures. Outside of research, Wataru volunteers for a non-profit education organization, and plays soccer for DUSC.

 


Congratulations! Mathematics Department faculty congratulates 3 senior Math and Computer Science Research students with mastery of advanced areas of Mathematics and Computer Science demonstrated by the Finalist awards of the NYC Metro Junior Science and Humanities Symposia (JSHS) 2018: Wataru Takada, Vera Zarubin, and Philippe Baron.

Faculty Adviser: Dr. Vladimir Shapovalov.            

AP Mathematics: Mr. Vikram Arora.


1) 

Takada, Wataru, First Place Winner in Mathematics

On the Growth of Exponential Progressions

 

Wataru is a Bronx Science senior from Manhattan. His project is focused on developing a growth model for a new object in additive combinatorics related to sumsets that used numerical optimization to obtain sharp bounds for the size of specific cases of base sets over Shimura varieties in Weisstraus restriction mappings. After he created his mathematical model, the numerical optimization algorithm was inputted into Mathematica as a non-linear programming process. There were no previous experts to explore sumsets with torsion free groups that allow well-defined exponential operators, which makes exponential progressions a completely unique object of study within this field. While studies in exponential representations of integers through minimal g-adic representations have been discussed in the works of Nathanson and Khovanskii in the context of metric geometries with bi-Lipschitz equivalence and group nets, this project aimed for a simpler and more effective approach with base-n integer representations. With this successful approach, he would be able to predict the growth rate of exponential progressions over a much more general class of base structures. Outside of research, Wataru volunteers for a non-profit education organization, and plays soccer for DUSC.

 

2)

Zarubin, Vera, First Place Winner in Engineering

A Novel Methodology to Build Organic Multifunctional Materials via Magnetic Alignment 

 

Vera is a Bronx Science senior from the Bronx in the Mathematics/Computer Science Research Program. Her project in materials science and engineering focuses on the application of magnetophoresis, or the motion induced by a magnetic field on a particle in a fluid, to control the assembly of polymers. Vera implemented thermodynamics equations to describe magnetophoresis and discovered through experimentation that the application of magnetic fields resulted in the alignment of robust nanostructures. Her approach significantly outperforms attempts of experts in the field. Her methodology is applicable to the assembly of polymers for energy harvesting applications and nanoscale biomedical devices. Outside of research, Vera is a member of the Bronx Science cross country and track teams and plays classical clarinet.

 

3)

Baron, Philippe,  Third Place Winner in Chemistry

Redefining Protein Stability with the First Adequate Model for Secondary Structure Calculations

 

Philippe is a Bronx Science senior from Queens. His project in computational chemistry involved the use of differential equations dealing with Hamiltonian and Lagrangian mechanics in order to evaluate the adequacy of a model for describing the structure of proteins. He used Python programming in order see if his mathematical model can effectively describe the Snow Flea Antifreeze Protein (sfAFP) and its unusual structure. The confirmation of this model’s adequacy leads to further applications by experts of this model to other proteins and to fields such as computational drug design. In addition, his paper proposed a future experiment which used this model as the first computational approach to determining the origins of the unique properties of the sfAFP through analysis of the hydration patterns this protein can create. Outside of research, Philippe is a national and international competitor in Taekwondo, captain of the Bronx Science co-ed robotics team (the SciBorgs), and is a volunteer teacher at a school for mathematics on the weekends.

 

Click here for more information about the awards above.



Congratulations! Mathematics Department faculty congratulates 7 senior Math and Computer Science Research students with mastery of advanced areas of Mathematics and Computer Science demonstrated by the 2018 Regeneron Science Talent Search scholar awards. 

Faculty Adviser: Dr. Vladimir Shapovalov.            
AP Mathematics: Mr. Vikram Arora.

Congratulations! Mathematics Department faculty congratulates 7 senior Math and Computer Science Research students with mastery of advanced areas of Mathematics and Computer Science demonstrated by the 2018 Regeneron Science Talent Search scholar awards. 
Faculty Adviser: Dr. Vladimir Shapovalov.            
AP Mathematics: Mr. Vikram Arora. 

1) 
Asch, Alexa 
Sigma 1 Receptor Mediates IL-24 Induced Cancer Apoptosis Through Lipid Raft Formation: An in vitro and in silico Approach

Alexa is a Bronx Science senior from Manhattan. Her research project focuses on the molecular mechanisms behind cancer apoptosis. She discovered that Sigma-1R mediates IL-24 induced apoptosis through the formation of lipid rafts and developed a unique methodology combining in vitro and in silico procedures that can be applied to numerous other diseases. Through the use of Cluspro algorithms, she computationally determined the best configurations of the two proteins’ interaction and the best configurations of the interaction between Sig-1R and an IL-24 peptide, based on energy and cluster size. Her research is very valuable in developing safer and more effective cancer treatments, including personalized precision treatments and combined drug therapy. Alexa is also a member of the varsity softball team and varsity table tennis team. She is a member of the National Honor Society. Alexa is also an editor-in-chief of the Math Bulletin, a managing editor of the school newspaper, a reporter for the school yearbook, and a morning announcer. Outside of school, she plays travel softball and volunteers as a coach for a softball little league. 

2) 
Baron, Philippe 
Redefining Protein Stability with the First Adequate Model for Secondary Structure Calculations

Philippe is a Bronx Science senior from Queens. His project in computational chemistry involved the use of differential equations dealing with Hamiltonian and Lagrangian mechanics in order to evaluate the adequacy of a model for describing the structure of proteins. He used Python programming in order see if his mathematical model can effectively describe the Snow Flea Antifreeze Protein (sfAFP) and its unusual structure. The confirmation of this model’s adequacy leads to further applications by experts of this model to other proteins and to fields such as computational drug design. In addition, his paper proposed a future experiment which used this model as the first computational approach to determining the origins of the unique properties of the sfAFP through analysis of the hydration patterns this protein can create. Outside of research, Philippe is a national and international competitor in Taekwondo, captain of the Bronx Science co-ed robotics team (the SciBorgs), and is a volunteer teacher at a school for mathematics on the weekends.

3) 
Chen, Tainon 
Estrogen Receptor Beta-1 and Its Isoform Estrogen Receptor Beta-2 as Novel Therapeutic Targets for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer 

Tainon is a Bronx Science senior from Queens. In his project, he identified two potential therapeutic targets for overcoming the radiation resistance of the most prevalent type of lung cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a highly radiation- and chemo-resistant type of cancer which comprises around 85% of lung cancers. Using molecular biology techniques, he showed that the protein estrogen receptor beta-2 (ERβ2) was primarily responsible for the aggressive metastatic nature of NSCLC. By developing a mathematical model for cell survival, he showed that a variation of the same protein, estrogen receptor beta-1 (ERβ1), largely nullifies the radiation resistance of NSCLC. This knowledge can be clinically exploited to develop a cure for NSCLC. Outside of research, Tainon is also a violinist in the school orchestra, a member of the Science Olympiad team, and a Boy Scout. In his free time, he enjoys track cycling.

4) 
Mitsuya, Ryoha 
A Novel Methodology in Measuring the Excitability of M1 Pyramidal Neurons and Modeling the Computational Capacity of Dendrites 

Ryoha is a senior from Manhattan. Ryoha observed a simple linear summation pattern in the inputs received by Pyramidal neurons, and theorized that there is a linearizing function performed by the dendrites to counteract the local nonlinear summation pattern found in dendrite branches. Ryoha created algorithms to simulate the behaviors of Pyramidal neurons, through Python and NEURON, while using MATLAB to perform dimensionality reduction. His work creates a path for the development of neuroprosthetics, and more accurate models of the brain. Ryoha is the president of Philosophy Club and a member of the school Math Team.

5) 
Qi, Justin 
Out of the Frying Pan, Into the Fire: Secondary Uranium Uptake Problems in ESR Dating Eastern Europe’s Oldest Hearths at Medzhibozh, Ukraine 

Justin is a Bronx Science senior from the Bronx. Last year, he used Electron Spin Resonance dating, a quantum physics and geochemistry-based technique bridging the gap between the limits of carbon-14 and uranium series dating, to calculate tectonic uplift rates. By studying a Turkish site where up to 300,000 people have died per major earthquake, Justin predicted locations of multiple new faults. This research, now pending publication in the journal  Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, provides the opportunity to implement earthquake early warning systems capable of decreasing death tolls by up to ten times. 
This year, Justin deepened the insight from the methodology he developed and applied it to the origins of humanity. In response to 150 years of inconclusive research on Neanderthal extinction, he dated mammal teeth from Balkan caves. Justin found that while Neanderthal populations declined before modern humans arrived in Europe, their populations rebounded before being assimilated by Homo sapiens. By reconciling conflicting explanations of Neanderthal demographics, Justin’s work makes a major contribution to our understanding of human evolution, making him the only high school student orally presenting at the Geological Society of America conference this year.
Justin also worked on another project this year, calculating ages for the first habitual human use of fire in Eastern Europe. By dating mammal teeth in Ukraine, his results suggest that the first human fireplaces appeared in Europe around 400,000 years ago, marking a significant advancement in our knowledge of the spread of fire use from Africa to Europe. Moreover, Justin’s research also suggests the potential to adjust calculated ages for errors resulting from changes in the chemical composition of archaeological sites, providing the opportunity to date many sites that previously could never yield accurate ages. As the first author on the resulting publications, Justin will present this research at two professional conferences in 2018.
Outside research, Justin is also the PF Administrator of the Bronx Science Speech & Debate Team and editor-in-chief of the Math Bulletin.

6) 
Su, Jessica 
A New Computational Model for the Detection of Microcephaly: A Much Needed Method in the Age of Zika 

Jessica is a Bronx Science senior from Queens. Her project is focused on the application of a newly developed conceptual framework of the functional dependence of the ratio of the sizes of the leg to the abdomen on time in order to detect microcephaly at an earlier stage. In the age of Zika, there is a newfound importance for being able to detect microcephaly earlier to allow the possibility of treating the condition. Previously, scientists have been focused diagnosing microcephaly using growth charts based on gestational age estimates, which are proven to be intrinsically inaccurate. This new methodology uses the novel approach of assessing growth in terms of cells rather than grams or pounds. This approach allows clinicians to accurately and reliably detect microcephaly at an earlier stage. Outside of research, she is a veteran member of the SciBorg’s Robotics Team at Bronx Science, a player on the Varsity Badminton Team, and a pianist. She has performed several times at Carnegie Hall for winning the Grand Prix Prize at the International Music and Arts Society’s Talented Young Musician Olympia Competition. 

7) 
Zarubin, Vera Alexandra 
A Novel Methodology to Build Organic Multifunctional Materials via Magnetic Alignment 

Vera is a Bronx Science senior from the Bronx in the Mathematics/Computer Science Research Program. Her project in materials science and engineering focuses on the application of magnetophoresis, or the motion induced by a magnetic field on a particle in a fluid, to control the assembly of polymers. Vera implemented thermodynamics equations to describe magnetophoresis and discovered through experimentation that the application of magnetic fields resulted in the alignment of robust nanostructures. Her approach significantly outperforms attempts of experts in the field. Her methodology is applicable to the assembly of polymers for energy harvesting applications and nanoscale biomedical devices. Outside of research, Vera is a member of the Bronx Science cross country and track teams and plays classical clarinet.

Click here for more information about the awards above.










It is with great pleasure that we announce that our Dr. Shapovalov has been recognized by the Regeneron Science Talent Search committee as a Teacher of Merit for 2017.  This is a testimony to his hard work and dedication towards our math and computer science research students.  His certificate can be viewed here​​​​​​​.


Mathematics Department faculty congratulates Senior Math Research student Justin Qi with mastery of advanced areas of mathematics and computer science demonstrated at the 2017 Geological Society of America meeting.


Justin was the only high school student allowed to make an oral presentation at the international conference which is typically attended by about 7,000 scientists from all over the world annually.

 

Faculty Adviser: Dr. Vladimir Shapovalov. AP Mathematics: Mr. Vikram Arora.

 

Justin is a Bronx Science senior from the Bronx. Last year, his project focused on fault prediction in tectonically active regions. In response to a 60 percent increase in major earthquakes since the 1980s, he used Electron Spin Resonance dating, a quantum physics and geochemistry-based technique bridging the gap between the limits of carbon-14 and uranium series dating, to calculate tectonic uplift rates through a series of numerical integration techniques. By studying a Turkish site where up to 300,000 people have died per major earthquake, which result from active fault systems with dozens of undiscovered faults, Justin predicted locations of and calculated time-averaged uplift rates for several new faults. This provides the opportunity to implement advanced earthquake early warning systems capable of decreasing death tolls by up to ten times. This year, Justin deepened the insight from the methodology he developed and applied it to the origins of humanity. In response to more than 150 years of inconclusive research on Neanderthal extinction, he dated mammal teeth from caves in the Balkans, calculating ages challenging the traditional narrative of Neanderthal extinction. Variations in external dose rates and enamel uranium concentrations made it necessary to mathematically test how assumed values for these variables affected the ages. Justin found that while Neanderthal populations declined before modern humans arrived in Europe, their populations then rebounded afterwards before being genetically assimilated by Homo sapiens. By reconciling conflicting explanations of Neanderthal demographics, Justin’s work makes a major contribution to our understanding of human evolution. Outside research, Justin is also Coordinator of the Bronx Science Speech & Debate Team and editor-in-chief of the Math Bulletin.



Mathematics Department faculty congratulates Junior Math Research student Jialin Zhuo with mastery of advanced areas of mathematics and computer science demonstrated at the 2017 Geological Society of America meeting.

 

Jialin was the only high school student allowed to make a poster presentation at the international conference which is typically attended by about 7,000 scientists from all over the world annually.


Faculty Adviser: Dr. Vladimir Shapovalov.            

AP Mathematics: Mr. Vikram Arora.


Jialin is a Bronx Science junior from Queens. Jialin's project focused on the presence of Neanderthals in the Balkans. She used Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) dating method, a quantum physics and geochemistry-based technique bridging the gap between the limits of carbon-14 and uranium dating. The method included the implementation of Linear Algebra and Numerical Integration and were used to accurately calculate ages for four bovid teeth from Golema Pest, the only Macedonian site with Neanderthal artifacts. From the results she concluded that Neanderthals disappeared from the site around 70 thousand years ago and never returned. Jialin is also a member of the all girls Bronx Science FeMaiden robotics team and the varsity fencing team.



Mathematics Department faculty congratulates Annie Wang with mastery of advanced areas of mathematics and computer science confirmed by KDD 2017: The 23rd ACM SIGKDD International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining in Halifax, Canada, 2017.


Annie was the only high school student presenting her research to the audience of the professional scientists at the international conference.


Faculty Adviser: Dr. Vladimir Shapovalov.

AP Mathematics: Mr. Vikram Arora.

 

Annie Wang is a Bronx Science senior from Queens. She attended the KDD 2017: The 23rd ACM SIGKDD International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining in Halifax, Canada on August 14, 2017. Annie and another co-author Hansaim Lim presented their paper ANTENNA, a Multi-Rank, Multi-Layered Recommender System for Inferring Reliable Drug-Gene-Disease Associations: Repurposing Diazoxide as a Targeted Anti-Cancer Therapy in the BIOKDD 2017 Workshop. The paper talks about her project which focuses on the repurposing FDA-approved drug Diazoxide as a precision medicine for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) by integrating machine learning and molecular modeling. Her new conceptual framework shows promising future discoveries of repurposed FDA-approved drug for combating other diseases. On her free time, she likes to code, play badminton and listen to music. Outside of research, Annie is an intern at City Mission, a nonprofit organization which strives to meet basic needs of the city and empower others to do the same, and the co-captain of the Varsity Badminton team.


Congratulations! George Stefanakis won 2017 Milton Fischer scholarship for Creativity. He graduated in June (and is at MIT now), but the results of the competition were announced very late (in September). 

Faculty Adviser: Dr. Vladimir Shapovalov. AP Mathematics: Mr. Vikram Arora.

George Stefanakis won 2017 Milton Fischer scholarship for Creativity. He graduated in June (and is at MIT now), but the results of the competition were announced very late (in September). 

Faculty Adviser: Dr. Vladimir Shapovalov. AP Mathematics: Mr. Vikram Arora.

George is one of only 7 students in the country who were recognized for their creative achievements in arts, sciences, math and other areas of human endeavor. His project addresses A Novel Methodology Addressing Two Major Obstacles in Developing the Elusive Quantum Computer.

George is a Bronx Science senior from Queens. He developed a new methodology for the construction of the quantum computer: a revolutionary machine operating on modern physical principles which can solve certain problems exponentially more quickly than the most powerful of classical computers. He used methods from quantum physics, including systems of partial differential equations, to implement a model of his system using MATLAB and Mathematica codes. George was able to overcome two major obstacles in the creation of the quantum computer, and the system George has proposed in his mathematical model has far-reaching applications in security, biological modeling, and medicine. Beyond his research, George is the Senior Editor of the Math Bulletin, a member of the school Math Team and National Honor Society, and a volunteer tutor at his former elementary school.

Awards:

1) Regeneron Science Talent Search Scholar 

2) NYCSEF Third Award

3) US Navy and Marine Corps Award (NYCSEF) 

4) Mu Alpha Theta (NYCSEF)

5) TEPTU Science Research & Entrepreneurship Competition finalist 

6) The NYC Metro and Long Island 2017 Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (JSHS) Second Place Winner 

7) 2017 Milton Fischer scholarship for Creativity 


Congratulations! Senior Math Research student, Vera Zarubin, was named Davidson Fellows Scholar 2017.


Faculty Adviser: Dr. Vladimir Shapovalov.

AP Mathematics: Mr. Vikram Arora.


Information about Vera's project in materials science and engineering, A Novel Methodology to Build Organic Thermoelectric Materials for Sustainable and Renewable Energy Applications, can be found in her biographical profile at the bottom of this page.


Results of the competition were announced over the summer.

Click here for more information about this particular award


Other awards won by Vera can also be found in her biographical profile at the bottom of this page.


This is the 51st award won by Math Research students this year! Other students and their awards are listed below.


Davidson Fellows competition is listed among the top 7 undergraduate scholarships by the US News Report alongside the Regeneron STS and Siemens competitions.


Click here for the US News Report List




Click here for online Regents practice


Click here for Recent Announcements




Recognition of students’ outstanding mastery of mathematics and computer science by top scholarships and research competitions in 2017.


 
In 2017 students of the Mathematics and Computer Science Department demonstrated mastery of university graduate school level research concepts in mathematics and computer science. They completed original research projects guided by Dr. Vladimir Shapovalov and won top awards by entering research competitions for college scholarships of the highest caliber. Working with mentoring professors from leading universities, the students developed mathematical and computational models for applications to numerous areas of mathematics, science and computer science.


Mathematics / Computer Science Research students entered a dozen competitions this year. 8 competitions have announced their results already and 4 more competitions will announce their results during the summer vocations. Students won 50 awards so far. Two Math Research students (Nikhil Devraj and Neeraj Sakhrani) have already published research papers with their mentors in professional peer reviewed journals. Neeraj Sakhrani has also presented his research at the Geological Society of America annual meeting usually attended by around 7,000 to 8,000 geologists from all over the world each year.


Our winners are:


• Aidan Gibbons


• Ajmain Yamin


• Anna Yang


• Charlotte Kavaler


• David Yi 


• George Stefanakis


• Gregory Gueorguiev 


• Justin Qi


• Kathryn Wicks


• Matthew Weiss


• Nandini Sharma


• Neeraj Sakhrani


• Nikhil Devraj


• Sophia Wang


• Tyron Zhang


• Vera Zarubin




These 14 Senior and 2 Junior Mathematics / Computer Science Research students won the following awards:


1) Regeneron Science Talent Search (STS) Scholar – 5 awards


    Click here for more information about Regeneron STS Scholars


2) Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) – 9 awards


2nd place award


3rd place award


America Geoscience Institute award for Outstanding Performance

in Earth Science


Recognition by MIT Lincoln Lab - Asteroid named

after the student


American Statistical Association Honorable Mention award


Finalist – 4 awards


Click here for more information about ISEF award winners


Click here for more information about the CUNY NYC Science

and Engineering Fair Participants

3) The International Sustainable World Energy, Engineering, and        

     Environment Project


(I-SWEEEP) Competition silver medal award  – 1 award


Click here for more information about I-SWEEEP winners


Click here for the 2017 I-SWEEEP Engineering Results


4) MIT THINK 2017 winner – 1 award 


Click here for more information about MIT's THINK 2017 winners


5) Sigma Xi Student Research Showcase section winner – 1 award 


Click here for more information about Sigma Xi's 2017 Student Research Showcase


6) New York City Science and Engineering Fair (NYCSEF) - 20 awards


First Award – 6 awards


Second Award -1 award


Third Award – 4 awards


Mu Alpha Theta – 2 awards


NASA Earth System Science Award – 1 award


US Navy and Marine Corps Award – 3 awards


ASU Walton Sustainability Solutions Initiatives – 1 award


The City University of New York Scholarship - Hunter

College – 1 award


Con Edison Innovation in STEM Award – 1 award


         Click here for CUNY's NYCSEF Participant List


7) TEPTU Science Research & Entrepreneurship Competition – 11 awards


Second Place – 1 award


Top Ten – 1 award


Finalist – 9 awards


Click here for the TEPTU 2017 Top 10 Finalists List


Click here for the complete list of TEPTU Finalists for 2017


8) The NYC Metro and Long Island 2017 Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (JSHS) – 2 awards


Second Place Winner 


Third Place Winner


Click here for the NYC Metro & Long Island 2017 JSHS Symposium Winners




The outstanding projects of these students are described below.  



• Aidan Gibbons:


Modeling the First Ever Molecular Explanation behind Commercially Feasible Hydrogen Sensors to Stimulate the Hydrogen Powered Automobile Market (a Density Functional Theory Approach)


Aidan is Bronx Science senior from Manhattan who modeled the first comprehensive molecular explanation behind the function of NiPd hydrogen sensors to stimulate the hydrogen powered automobile industry. He used Density Functional Theory, specifically Perdew-Wang generalized gradient approximations, on the Vienna Ab-Initio Simulation Package for molecular dynamics to optimize stability and metallic properties of NiPd substrate material. His optimization of stability, geometry, and charge transfer of the hydrogen and NiPd systems provide experimental chemists fundamental information to create hydrogen sensors for hydrogen powered automobiles, an environmentally friendly alternative to gas guzzlers. Aside from research, Aidan is co-president of S!NG, an actor in the drama department productions, a student representative on the School Leadership Team, and a member of the congressional debate team. 


Awards:


1) Regeneron Science Talent Search Scholar


2) NYCSEF Third Award


3) US Navy and Marine Corps Award (NYCSEF)


4) ASU Walton Sustainability Solutions Initiatives (NYCSEF)


5) TEPTU Science Research & Entrepreneurship Competition finalist 

 


• Ajmain Yamin:


n-Dimensional Fractions and a Generalized Calkin-WIlf Tree


Ajmain Yamin is a Bronx High School of Science senior from Queens.  His project is purely mathematical and is based on the Clakin-Wilf tree.  He generalized the Calkin-Wilf tree to a class of analogous trees where each tree is identified by its dimension number and where the original Calkin-Wilf tree has dimension 1.  His project investigates the properties of the general n-dimensional Calkin-Wilf tree and he proves that many of the interesting properties belonging to the original Calkin-Wilf tree extend into higher dimensions.  The chief property among them is that the nodes in the n-dimensional Calkin-Wilf tree are n-dimensional fractions in reduced form and each n-dimensional fraction in reduced form appears exactly once as a unique node on the tree.  Aside from doing research, he attends college level courses in mathematics and art at CUNY colleges and the Cooper Union. 


Awards:


1) Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) finalist


2) NYCSEF First Award


3) Mu Alpha Theta (NYCSEF)


4) The City University of New York Scholarship - Hunter College (NYCSEF)



• Anna Yang:


A Novel Method Involving Whole Methylation Profiling through the Application of Methylation Clock Reveals Epigenetic Progression in Alzheimer’s Disease 


Anna is a Bronx Science senior from Queens. Anna’s research project focuses on the methylation profiling that can reveal the epigenetic progression specifically in Alzheimer’s disease. Methylation profiling targets gene expression which may be helpful in understanding the mechanism underlying Alzheimer’s. Anna used the methylation clock, an algorithm that predicts the age and gender of tissues and cells, to determine if the methylation clock is accurate in predicting the age and if the clock acknowledges that there are different methylation patterns in different brain regions. Anna did this project to better understand the progression of Alzheimer’s disease across several brain regions. Her work provides a framework to create drugs that can combat Alzheimer’s disease. Anna is also the co-founder of the Bronx Science Make A Wish club and was a member of the girls varsity lacrosse team.


Award:


   TEPTU Science Research & Entrepreneurship Competition second place award


 

• Charlotte Kavaler:


First Effective Mathematical Model Allowing the Dramatic Improvement in the Efficiency of Biorotary Nanomotors Through the Application of Maxwell's Demon 


Charlotte Kavaler is a Bronx Science senior living in Brooklyn. In her project, she created a new model of nanomotor significantly increasing its efficiency. By combing to previously unrelated fields—an information-to-energy conversion—she was able to create a series of differential equations and Hamiltonians to model the system. After programming that system, she measured the improved outputs in various aspects. Outside of research, Charlotte captains her school's all-female robotics team, volunteers teaching middle school students Lego robotics, plays violin, and horseback rides.


Awards:


1) NYC Metro and Long Island 2017 Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (JSHS) third place award


2) TEPTU Science Research & Entrepreneurship Competition top ten award



• David Yi:


New Methodology for Identification of Novel Uses of Drugs Based on Language Pattern Analysis in Lycaeum, an Online Forum for Hallucinogens


A Bronx Science senior from Queens, David developed a methodology for gathering information regarding the usage of psychoactive substances using online internet sources. By analyzing the keywords present in drug forum discussions, he was able to develop a new method of gathering data on psychoactive substances and discover new potential drug combinations with potential widespread use. The algorithm developed discovers connections between two topics of interest from discussion and it is also applicable in other fields of research as well as business. Outside of research, David is also the president of Quizbowl, captain of the chess team, and a prominent member of the school and city math team. 


Award:


    TEPTU Science Research & Entrepreneurship Competition finalist 



• George Stefanakis:


A Novel Methodology Addressing Two Major Obstacles in Developing the Elusive Quantum Computer


George is a Bronx Science senior from Queens. He developed a new methodology for the construction of the quantum computer: a revolutionary machine operating on modern physical principles which can solve certain problems exponentially more quickly than the most powerful of classical computers. He used methods from quantum physics, including systems of partial differential equations, to implement a model of his system using MATLAB and Mathematica codes. George was able to overcome two major obstacles in the creation of the quantum computer, and the system George has proposed in his mathematical model has far-reaching applications in security, biological modeling, and medicine. Beyond his research, George is the Senior Editor of the Math Bulletin, a member of the school Math Team and National Honor Society, and a volunteer tutor at his former elementary school.


Awards:


1) Regeneron Science Talent Search Scholar


2) NYCSEF Third Award


3) US Navy and Marine Corps Award (NYCSEF)


4) Mu Alpha Theta (NYCSEF)


5) TEPTU Science Research & Entrepreneurship Competition finalist 


6) The NYC Metro and Long Island 2017 Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (JSHS) Second Place Winner

 


• Gregory Gueorguiev:


Novel Methodology for Co-clustering Identification and Analysis for Endemic Plants with Applications to Conservation and Agricultural Planning


Gregory is a Bronx Science senior who lives in Manhattan. Gregory’s project focuses on finding a new, more efficient method to prioritize conservation efforts using the spatial distributions of endemic plants, which can be considered indicators of biodiversity. He used specimens from around 15 endemic plant species and ArcGIS software to conduct multiple analyses, such as an Average Nearest Neighbor Summary and a Hierarchical Cluster Diagram, in order to statistically prove a clustering distribution in these plants. From his work, he discovered that these endemic plants cluster deterministically and co-cluster in geographically specific endemic foci. His hope is that this work will allow future policy makers to efficiently invest money into conserving important biodiverse regions. Other research projects Gregory has worked on include a patent-pending ACL Knee Brace that can protect future athletes from devastating injuries. Outside of research, Gregory plays competitive ice hockey, goes to the Manhattan School of Music, and is a part of the Bronx Science Big Sib Program. 


Awards:


1) Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) finalist


2) American Statistical Association Honorable Mention award (ISEF)


3) NYCSEF First Award



• Justin Qi:


Pushing the Boundaries: ESR Mollusc Dating near the Amik Triple Junction, Turkey


Justin is a Bronx Science junior from the Bronx whose project focused on fault prediction in tectonically active regions. In response to more than a 60 percent increase in major earthquakes since the 1980s, he used Electron Spin Resonance dating, a quantum physics and geochemistry-based technique bridging the gap between the limits of carbon-14 and uranium dating, to calculate tectonic uplift rates based on ages of mollusc shells. To provide a specific focus, he studied a site in southeastern Turkey, where up to 300,000 people have died per major earthquake, which result from active fault systems containing dozens of undiscovered faults. From his efforts, Justin predicted locations of multiple faults near active fault zones, providing the opportunity to implement advanced earthquake early warning systems capable of decreasing death tolls by up to ten times. Justin is also the Research Director of the Bronx Science Speech & Debate Team and editor-in-chief of the Math Bulletin.


Award:


    NYCSEF First Award



• Kathryn Wicks:


Executive Suite Volatility and Firm Performance: Implications for Policy and Investigating Company Behavior 


Kathryn Wicks is a Bronx Science senior from Manhattan. Her project investigates how companies react to changes in their executive suite. She found that companies do not react in a predictable manner surrounding executive changes, suggesting that the roles that upper-level managers occupy are more nuanced than an up/down judgment would suggest. This implies that companies in transition or crisis should analyze  each company officer, rather than "sweeping out the old guard" or "keeping in experience."  She used natural language processing to extract data from SEC filings, and compared company stock price trends to the performance of the S&P 500. This has applications in corporate governance and investing, as well as suggesting that the project should be expanded upon in order to uncover what makes an effective executive in a non-CEO position. Kathryn is a head of programming on the all-girls robotics team, a founder of TED-Ed club, and captain of the Ethics Bowl team.  


Awards:


1) NYCSEF Third Award


2) TEPTU Science Research & Entrepreneurship Competition finalist 



• Matthew Weiss:


The first quantitative model for photosynthesis with applications to highly efficient renewable biofuels, biotech (to produce pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals), nanobiotechnology and nanoengineering


A Bronx Science senior, Matthew has worked with and developed a new methodology to address the need for reliable way of interpreting quantum mechanics applied to photosynthetic complexes so that it can be applied to efficient, renewable solar panels and algae-cell-based sources of energy. Using MATLAB, Quantum electron transport theory, and support vector classification he was able to successfully derive optimal parameters for a model that is based off of algae cells mimicking extremely high efficiency and utilizing this with renewable biofuels for future applications in optoelectronics and nanoengineering.  Matthew also works at the NYU Langone medical center, where he meets with his mentor to develop models that mimic the extremely high efficiency of algae cells that produce ATP at rates near 99.99%. He also is a policy debater in the number one speech and debate team in the country from Bronx Science as well. He works with senior citizens over the summer, and continues to practice piano for eleven consecutive years.


Award:


    NYCSEF Third Award



• Nandini Sharma:


Localized Quantification and Proteomics of Neurofibrillary Tangles in Rapidly Progressive and Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease Patients


Nandini is a Bronx Science senior from Queens. Her research project focuses on unraveling the mechanism behind a recently classified subtype of Alzheimer’s Disease, known as rapidly progressive Alzheimer’s Disease (rpAD). Through quantification, advanced statistical analysis, and proteomics, she analyzed differences between the pathology of rpAD and sporadic AD patients, ultimately creating a conceptual framework to guide the development of a future cure to rpAD. Nandini is also President of the Nasha of Culture club, a member of the Pre-Medical Society, and an instructor for high school students at Khan’s Tutorial. 


Award:


    NYCSEF Second Award



• Neeraj Sakhrani:


Mathematically Cutting to the Bone:  Solving Analytical Problems 

in ESR Dating the Paleolithic Site at Isimila, Tanzania 


Neeraj is a Bronx Science senior from Queens. His project consisted of using the Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) dating method to accurately calculate ages for seven mammalian tooth subsamples from Isimila, Tanzania. Neeraj applied a series of integration techniques and developed a new iterative protocol to compute the ages for the most uranium-rich teeth. The high U concentrations made it necessary to mathematically test how the assumptions regarding radon loss, sedimentary water concentrations, and external radiation dose rates affected the calculated ages. Neeraj’s project provided ages that placed Isimila's Acheulean tools in the sequence of human evolutionary and archaeological developments during the Pleistocene Period. In addition to research, Neeraj is the Vice President of Tutoring for the National Honors Society, a senior editor for the Math Bulletin, a senator for the Student Organization, and the captain of the Varsity Tennis team. 


Awards:


1) Regeneron Science Talent Search Scholar


2) Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) 2nd place 


3) America Geoscience Institute prize for Outstanding Performance in Earth Science (ISEF)


4) Recognized by MIT Lincoln Lab - Asteroid named after Neeraj (ISEF)


5) Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) finalist


6) NYCSEF First Award


7) NASA Earth System Science Award (NYCSEF)



• Nikhil Devraj:


New Algorithm for Computational Diagnosis of Medical Diseases with Framework for Artificial Intelligence Implementation


Nikhil is a Bronx Science senior from Queens. Nikhil devised a new algorithm for computers to diagnose diseases in the same way that humans do. His motivation for creating this algorithm for clinical support systems was the speed and extensive capacity of knowledge that computers boast. He employed medical ontologies, the lambda calculus, and Bayes’ Theorem in order to show that the computer can manipulate medical information and return suggestions for diagnosis. Outside of his research projects, Nikhil is part of his school’s robotics team, part of his school’s and New York City’s math team, vice president of his school’s National Honor Society branch, and a member of his school’s Quiz Bowl team.


Awards:


1) Regeneron Science Talent Search Scholar


2) NYCSEF First Award


3) US Navy and Marine Corps Award (NYCSEF)


4) TEPTU Science Research & Entrepreneurship Competition finalist  



• Sophia Wang:


Row Sums of Mutated Calkin-Wilf Tree


Sophia is a Bronx Science senior from Manhattan. Her project in pure mathematics focused on the relationship between the row sums of the fundamental Calkin-Wilf Tree as well as investigated the disrupted patterns of the general version of the mutated Calkin-Wilf Tree. She based her initial observations on the basic tree, then expanded it to the general form, in the hopes of determining a formula to compute the sum of all the terms in any given row of a tree with any roots. Through trials with different roots, calculations of each row’s sum, and analysis of data through regression lines, she concluded that the previously apparent symmetry and patterns were now lost and there is only a formula for the fundamental tree. This project focused heavily in the area of number theory and involves linear algebra techniques. Outside of research, Sophia enjoys music, and holds skills in violin, piano, flute, and clarinet. She is a member of the Bronx Science Orchestra, leads the school’s East Asian Entertainment club as Vice President, is an avid member of the Math Team, competes in professional chess tournaments, and interns for a local State Assembly member.


Award:


    NYCSEF Third Award


 

• Tyrone Zhang:


A Novel Mathematical Model for Ice Storms


Tyrone is a Bronx Science senior residing in Queens. Although ice storms are known to last hours, previous models predicted ice storms that don’t last as long. His project overcomes this deficiency and focuses on the air layer that forms ice storms and combines two different factors that affect the layer’s temperature, finding different conditions necessary to sustain an ice storm for one hour. Using Matlab to create a new mathematical model, Tyrone looked at four different factors and found specific conditions needed for a one-hour ice storm. His research would help improve weather forecasts concerning ice storms. Tyrone is a member of his school’s Model United Nations, secretary of his school’s gardening club, and a member of the school’s math team.  


Awards:


1) Regeneron Science Talent Search Scholar


2) TEPTU Science Research & Entrepreneurship Competition finalist 



• Vera Zarubin:


Vera completed two projects this year. One – for MIT  THINK, the other one – for all other competitions (listed below).


MIT  THINK project:


Development and Testing of Functionalized Hypercrosslinked Polymer Resins for the Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements


Vera is a Bronx Science junior from the Bronx in the Mathematics/Computer Science Research Program. Her project in computational chemistry focuses on developing a model to recycle rare earth elements by affinity chromatography. Vera’s novel approach is applicable to recycling magnets from electronic devices to diversify and improve the sustainability of the rare earths supply chain. She used systems of partial differential equations and molecular dynamics simulations to create a model of her chromatography system. To confirm her model, Vera designed and tested ligand-modified thermo-responsive resins that could separate rare earth elements. Previously, scientists had tried to develop a selective rare earths recovery system and were not as successful because the system only recognized differences in elements based on a single parameter.  On the other hand, Vera’s affinity chromatography method separates ions based on several parameters such as size, coordination chemistry, and geometry and thus exhibits high selectivity for valuable rare earth elements. Outside of research, Vera is a member of the Bronx Science cross country and track teams and plays classical clarinet.


Other competitions project:


A Novel Methodology to Build Organic Thermoelectric Materials for Sustainable and Renewable Energy Applications


Vera is a Bronx Science junior from the Bronx in the Mathematics/Computer Science Research Program. Her project in materials science and engineering focuses on the application of magnetophoresis, or the motion induced by a magnetic field on a particle in a fluid, to control the assembly of polymers. Vera implemented thermodynamics equations to describe magnetophoresis and discovered through experimentation that the application of magnetic fields resulted in the alignment of robust nanostructures. Her approach significantly outperforms attempts of experts in the field. Her methodology is applicable to the assembly of polymers for energy harvesting applications and nanoscale biomedical devices. Outside of research, Vera is a member of the Bronx Science cross country and track teams and plays classical clarinet.


Awards:


1) Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) 3rd Place


2) Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) finalist


3) The International Sustainable World Energy, Engineering, and Environment Project (I-SWEEEP) Competition silver medal award 


4) MIT THINK 2017 winner


5) Sigma Xi Student Research Showcase section winner


6) NYCSEF First Award


7) Con Edison Innovation in STEM Award (NYCSEF)


   



2017 Math Department

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